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US Coal Use is Plunging at Fastest Rate Since Eisenhower Era

 

 

March 6, 2020 - US coal use plunged more than 13% in 2019, the most in 65 years, as power plants shut down across the country. That’s poised to happen again this year.

Total consumption slumped to 596-million tons in 2019 from 688-million tons in the prior year, according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year, the figure is expected to slip again, to 517-million tons.

The decline reflects the rapidly changing US energy mix, as coal is increasingly struggling to compete on price with natural gas, wind and solar. The dirtiest fossil fuel is also facing growing pressure for its role in climate change, prompting states from California to New York to mandate a transition to clean energy. President Donald Trump’s efforts to revive the industry have done little to stem the inexorable shift away from coal.

“It’s definitely a stark rebuke to to all of Trump’s promises that he’s going to bring the coal industry back,” Mary Anne Hitt, director of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal campaign, said Thursday in an interview.

US consumption plunged 14% during a brief recession back in 1954, but promptly rebounded almost 15% the following year, according to EIA data.

Utilities have already announced plans this year to shut at least seven plants. Last year, the second-biggest on record for retirements, about 18 GW of coal capacity went dark or were given a timeline for closing, according to the Sierra Club.